Saturday, September 3, 2016

CtBF’s Spiced Meatballs with Sriracha Sauce ~~ Merguez Meatballs


CTBF’s Spiced Meatballs with Yogurt Sauce
This week for CtBF'S our pick was Spiced Meatballs with Sriracha Sauce from David Lebovitz' cookbook, "My Paris Kitchen". I was not excited about making these meatballs. My hubby doesn't enjoy spicy food, but I thought he might like them if I didn't overdo the spice. I was partially right. He ate them and said the taste was different, but he preferred his meatballs “Italian Style." Really?  David tells us this is considered street food in Paris. Funny thing is, they reminded me of the middle eastern street food, sold in carts on the streets of NYC. It was the flavor…aka spices. I love those Moroccan flavors!

So glad I had some fresh pita on hand…it made for a perfect dish

I chose to use lamb. I love lamb, and it cooked up so flavorful. My butcher makes a lamb burger mixture that is not too lean; it made perfect meatballs. I cooked mine in my cast iron frypan. The aroma was fabulous.

These were an unexpected surprise…totally delicious!

The photo in David’s cookbook shows him eating his sausage in what looks like a pita to me. I knew that’s the way I would serve mine. I made both sauces because my hubby likes mayo and I prefer yogurt. I also decided to serve mine with sliced tomatoes and cucumbers. I have so many sitting on my counter!  My garden has been quite plentiful this year.

The flavor was wonderfully delicious.  These were a win for me and an ok for my hubby. I know these would be a welcomed dish for either of my sons. They love spicy! I will definitely be making them again. Happy Labor Day weekend everyone! And if you live in the path of Hermine, stay safe!!

My lamb meatballs had a lot of fat, but...

they cooked up perfectly and were marvelous with the yogurt sauce, cucumbers and tomatoes!
Ahhhh….scrumptious!


Thursday, September 1, 2016

TWD ~ BCM Matcha Financiers ~ Rewind Post

Matcha Financiers
Today I have a makeup for Tuesdays with Dorie's rewind day. Honestly, I've missed many recipes this year. I'm hoping to get back into baking now that we are entering the fall season.  Although it seems that my hubby's diet has also curtailed my baking adventures. I have been watching with delight the TWD posts, thinking I should be baking this one or that one. So, here I am! This was a perfect makeup for me. Financiers freeze quite well. So when I feel like something sweet with my tea, I can just pull a few out and enjoy. 

Since I have some antique financier molds, I baked half the batter in the molds and half the batter in a mini muffin tin. 

Ever since I started cooking and baking along with French Friday’s, I have discovered so many new favorite recipes, such as Financiers. These delicious French Pastries have become my go-to whenever I host a gathering. I’ve baked Dories’ plain and chocolate financiers, and both were lovely.  I adore anything with almond paste or almond flour...so these Financiers jumped right to the top of my list.  Right from the beginning, I was surprised at how wonderfully easy and delicious they were. And since, I love antique bakeware, I went on a search for some old Financier molds, and was lucky enough to find about 12. I have used them many times. I think I made a good investment!
I’ve had my eye on these “Matcha” babies, made with green tea powder (matcha) since I first opened Dorie's new cookbook "Baking Chez Moi". They did not disappoint!

Did I mention Green Tea Latte is my favorite drink at Starbucks? 

Perfect for an elegant tea party...
or just anytime you feel like something a tad sweet
This post participates with Tuesdays with Dorie. Here’s the link for the recipes that members chose for this week’s Rewind Post.
Matcha Financiers
Adapted from Dorie Greenspan’s “Baking Chez Moi"
As posted in the LATimes
Note: Look for a culinary- or commercial-grade tea; I use Harney & Sons Matcha Culinary Grade. 
Makes 30 mini cakes.
  
  sticks unsalted butter cut into chunks 
2/3  cup all-purpose flour 
  teaspoons matcha green tea (see above) 
Pinch of fine sea salt 
1 cup sugar 
1 cup (100 grams) almond or hazelnut flour 
6 large egg whites, at room temperature, lightly beaten



1. Heat the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat until it starts to boil, then boil for 1 minute; it may color ever so slightly, but you don’t want it to be brown. Remove the pan from the heat and set it aside (you want the butter to be warm when you add it). 
2. Whisk the all-purpose flour, matcha and salt together in a small bowl. 
3. Using a flexible spatula, stir the sugar and nut flour together in a large bowl. Gradually add the egg whites, stirring to moisten the dry ingredients. 
4. When all the whites are in, give the mix a few vigorous stirs. Stir in the all-purpose flour mixture, mixing only until it’s evenly blended, then start adding the melted butter, a little at a time, folding and stirring the batter until all the butter is in, a feat that will seem miraculous. You’ll have a pea-green batter with a sheen to it. 
5. Press a piece of plastic wrap against the surface of the batter and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. (The batter can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.) 
6. When you’re ready to bake: Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Butter the cups of a mini muffin tin (or tins; you can make as many or as few financiers as you want — there’s enough batter for 30), dust with flour and tap out the excess (or use baker’s spray, a mix of vegetable oil and flour). 
7. Spoon the batter into the muffin cups, filling them almost to the top. 
8. Bake the financiers for 12 to 14 minutes, or until they have crowned and feel springy to the touch; their tops may have cracked, and that’s fine. They’ll be browned around the edges (and on the bottom) and a beautiful green in the center. 
9. Remove the tin(s) from the oven, wait 1 minute, then tap them against the counter to encourage the financiers to tumble out. Pry any stragglers from their molds with a table knife. Transfer the financiers to a rack and let cool until they are just warm or at room temperature.