Friday, November 7, 2014

FFWD ~ Jerusalem Artichoke Soup with Parsley Coulis


FFWD ~ Jerusalem Artichoke Soup with Parsley Coulis

This week, our recipe for French Fridays is Jerusalem Artichoke Soup, with Parsley Coulis.  Strange as it sounds, just a month ago I was completely unfamiliar with the Jerusalem artichoke...aka sunchokes. I never heard of this very tasty tuber before making the Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes for FF’s last month. I checked many of the markets in my area to no avail.  In desperation, I bought several pounds on e-bay. Knowing this soup was on our agenda, I bought extra!  I also planned on planting some. Thanks to Teresa of One Wet Foot, I learned that they are a very invasive tuber. Where could I plant them? After giving it some thought, I decided to plant a handful on the edge of the woods that line my yard. The only thing that’s been growing there are weeds.  This sunflower like plant should add some lovely color.  And the best part, if they take I will be able to make this delicious soup again next year!
 
Warm, comforting and delicious
The soup calls for about 2 lbs. of Jerusalem artichokes. The prep for the soup is pretty easy. Giving them a good scrub is all you really need to do, however I peeled mine. 
I only made some miner changes to this recipe. One was the amount of sunchokes. Instead of 2 pounds, I used 1 pound and 1 pound of potatoes. The recipe then calls for onions, garlic, celery and leeks, to be sautéed in a few tablespoons of butter. After they have softened, add the sunchokes and potatoes, along with the chicken broth. The recipe calls for eight cups, but I like my soup thick so I used six. When the sunchokes and potatoes have softened, the mixture is then pureed into a velvety smooth soup. The flavor was extraordinarily delicious! It makes me wish I had more sunchokes in my pantry! Next year! 
Bill and I both enjoyed this steaming bowl of creamy soup on a cool, damp, rainy night here in New Jersey! Happy Friday everyone!

This recipe can be found in Dorie Greenspans cookbook, “Around My French Table” or here where it has been published.  To see what the other Doristas thought of this soup check it out here.


There is nothing quite as nice on a wet, damp, cold day than a warming bowl of soup
Luscious!

29 comments:

  1. Based on what I've read so far, you made a great call combining the sunchokes with potatoes for the soup. A happy medium between the recipe and my make-up leek and potato soup.

    Good to see that you agree with my friend Nelly about shopping in Georgetown! ;-)

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  2. Maybe the addition of potatoes was the answer! So glad both you and Bill enjoyed :)

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  3. I have never had a Jerusalem artichoke...your soup looks really creamy and tasty, Kathy.

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  4. Oh, the potatoes are a great substitution, I'd bet! Thanks for that tip! Also, I love that pyrex dish you've served the soup in for the photos--indeed, the photos overall are gorgeous!

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    1. Katie, The dishes I used to serve the soup in are 1930’s-40’s Weil Ware. They were made in California. I happen to love and collect old dinnerware. Thanks for noticing!

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    2. Those dishes are gorgeous, Kathy!

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  5. If we're handing out awards, so far, you win! Your soup looks delicious and you used sunchokes and you liked it! After reading that they can cause gastrointestinal distress I decided to stop searching for them!

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  6. Dear Kathy, Next year I will have to try this. I never used Sun Chokes either. Sounds like a lovely soup. It is windy, chilly and damp here too. Blessings dear. Catherine

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  7. This looks so creamy and silky. You're so smart to plant your own sunchokes Kathy!

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  8. Your soup looks wonderful! We liked this one too. Great idea to substitute some potatoes - I bet they added a wonderful creaminess.

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  9. Well look at you the adventurous cook and gardener, lol...I was intimidated by Jeruslaem artichokes for many years before I finally gave in and tried them. I think the key here was the addition of potatoes, Kathy. Good Call!!!

    Thank you so much for sharing...I can't wait for your chokes to grow:)

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  10. I was going to comment on your plates, but Katie beat me to it. I love that you planted some for next year! I see them growing in the woods, but was a little nervous to dig them up. This soup is perfect for a damp, cool day.

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  11. What a great idea, to plant some! I'm going to use your "half potato" idea. Everything's better with potatoes!

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  12. Glad you enjoyed the soup Kathy. Yours is such a pretty butter yellow - I used potatoes and ended up with brown sludge.

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  13. Yummy! I love Jerusalem Artichokes but planted them in the wrong place entirely and now no amount of digging out stops them coming back!

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  14. Ditto on the plates.
    I am very curious to hear how your sunchoke planting works out!

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  15. Oh my, I think I like the idea of you growing your own sunchokes as much as looking at the soup! Yours looks delicious, and I'm so happy you enjoyed this so much. I made a faux version, since no Jerusalem artichokes to be found. Ok enough, I'm excited to try the recommendation for having a little pesto with it!

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  16. This soup has a lovely colour, I would love to try it :D
    Haven't heard of Jerusalem artichokes before either!

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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  17. That soup looks delicious, Kathy. I am sure adding the potatoes made a big difference, I'm sorry I
    didn't try that. Have a great weekend.

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  18. I love, love, your Jerusalem Artichoke soup, Kathy! I've never made this soup and it sounds wonderful!
    Such a beautiful presentation, and delicious soup! Hugs,

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  19. Your soup looks beautiful and I'm glad you found a place to plant the sunchokes, too. Maybe they'll be the perfect thing to brighten up that spot by the woods. I bet this soup would be even better with the addition of potatoes (though we loved it with sunchokes alone).

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  20. Hmm I've never heard of this type of artichoke either. You are so brave to buy these from ebay!!! Your soup looks so delish.

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  21. We used to grow them in Maine and I loved how they took over, because that meant more to cook! The soup looks delicious and I can't wait to try it. ~ David

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  22. Hi Kathy, I just saw some sunchokes in the market this week, they are a little scary looking. Like your idea of adding in potatoes. Looks so creamy and delicious. Beautiful presentation!

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  23. Your soup looks more appealing than those that made sunchokes only. I could not find the elusive Jerusalem artichokes so I did a make up instead. Good luck growing the sunchokes.

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  24. Love that you enjoyed this so much. And from your gorgeous photo I can see why. I chickened out of the JA version and like that you did half and half with potatoes. Great idea. And that coulis really does give it the color kick. I will be very curious to learn the fate of the JA's you planted - nice idea :)

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  25. Good luck, hope your newly planted sunchokes yield something next year. I was also happy to be introduced to this new (for me) vegetable and will be keeping an eye out for it in the future.

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  26. Looks great--now I'm wondering how hard it would be to find the sunchokes here. I did some reading and it said they are related to asters, which would explain how the grow so well...

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