Friday, October 17, 2014

FFWD ~ Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes with Garlic

FFWD ~ Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes with Garlic
One thing I’ve learned, from our recent repertoire of recipes for French Fridays, is “don’t judge a book by its cover”!  This week we are seeing yet one more ugly star of a dish! Jerusalem Artichokes, sometimes called Sunchokes, are in no way attractive! They rival the Celery Root for ugliest veggie!

If you have never heard of the Jerusalem artichoke, you are not alone. When I asked my produce man if he had any, or if he could get some for me, he looked puzzled. Then he told me, he had never heard of such a veggie, and had never seen them offered by their suppliers! OK then!! I decided to get a bit creative, and search the Internet. To my surprise they were selling them on E-Bay! Really?? I truly believe that you can find just about anything on E-bay!

They really were quite good
According to Wikipedia, the Jerusalem Artichoke was first cultivated by Native Americans, long before the arrival of the Europeans. The French explorer, Samuel de Champlain, found domestically grown plants at Cape Cod in 1605.  He then brought the plant back with him to France. The Jerusalem artichoke had become a very common vegetable, for human consumption in Europe and the Americas, by the mid 1600s. The French, in particular, were especially taken with this ugly root vegetable. It reached its peak in popularity by the turn of the 19th century.  The 2002 Nice Festival, for the Heritage of the French Cuisine, chose the Jerusalem artichoke as the “Best Soup Vegetable”.  Who knew?

The recipe that Dorie shares is quite simple.  The worst part of the preparation, was the peeling of these very knobby roots.  Honestly, this is pretty much a non-recipe.  Place chunks of peeled sunchokes into a pie plate with a few tablespoons of olive oil, a few sprigs of rosemary, a few sprigs of thyme, salt and pepper. Then slice several cloves of garlic very thin, and add them to the pan. Roast twenty minutes at 400°, turn and roast another twenty minutes. That’s it! I really enjoyed these! They were different, sweeter and softer than a potato, but quite good. The best part was the roasted sliced garlic. Yum! And did Bill like them?  He didn’t appreciate the sweet taste and texture. I'd like to try them in soup some time, and see why the French chose them as “Best Soup Vegetable”.

Although this has been a month of ugly, for French Fridays, I have enjoyed our adventures in trying new things! Things I would have never tried without Dorie! Happy Friday everyone!

                                                              The ugly sunchoke root looks a bit like ginger root                              file photo
Peeled and ready for the oven
Roasted and ready to eat
I actually enjoyed this new adventure in eating
 My morning visitor

24 comments:

  1. I have never seen this kind of artichokes in our stores..and yes, they do look so much like ginger root. I am curious how they taste...

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    1. Angie they are not artichokes - they are part of the sunflower family! Kathy - these look lovely - I debated keeping them whole and wish I had - yours are really pretty!

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  2. I love Jerusalem artichokes , tasty delicious Kathy, look awesome:)

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  3. Well, at least he tried, gotta give him that. I really enjoyed these and agree that the preparation was the most strenuous part. Mine were far less knoby than yours, but still a bit of a chore. Absolutely worth it though. And I believe that we do indeed have a soup recipe in there so you'll get to taste the award winning soup vegetable again.

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  4. An interesting story on how these JA got over to europe and we ended up roasting them this week's friday post courtesy of Dorie Greenspan! But I used a sub or rather two... cos JA did not quite made the journey to the east!

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  5. What a pretty golden brown color on your sunchokes. If I had known I could have gotten some on eBay... :-)

    Ed wouldn't touch the chayote. You are lucky that Bill tried them.

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  6. Yeah, the peeling was definitely the hardest part of this dish! I got my boys to sample them...but they didn't want more than a taste. At least they are more willing than Bill in this regard...I think they both like to be able to say they've eaten Jerusalem artichokes, ostrich, and other oddities :) I liked these, but would rather have potatoes...but always glad to try something new thanks to Dorie!

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  7. I've never cookied with them either but I love the combination of ingredients.

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  8. Wow, Kathy - I'll have to make this one up as well. Your presentation is lovely. And, I adore your visitor!

    Have a lovely weekend!

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  9. I'm surprised that you didn't have sunchokes. They have been in my green market for a few weeks now. You got some really knobby ones. Mine were straight and easy to peel, but I won't be making these again...If I couldn't handle them mixed with potatoes there is no way I am going to eat them concentrated in a soup. I may have to substitute eye of newt.

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  10. I really hated peeling these. Diane's were so straight. Yours were knobby, but not as knobby as the ones I got. I really enjoyed the taste though. It was definitely something different, wasn't it? Have a great weekend, Kathy!

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  11. I love these. When I was paging through Facebook with my colleague yesterday (looking for a work-related post, of course) she saw your post and exclaimed, "oh - those look great!" I agreed!

    Markipedia shared with me that we call them Jerusalem artichokes because of the Italian word for them - Girasole, which means 'turn to the sun." And, since Jerusalem artichokes are in the sunflower family, they are called Girasole in Italian which, when said in English, became Jerusalem. :)

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  12. It's amazing how such an ugly veggie can turn out looking so tasty. Yours are super roasted, just the way
    I like to roast potatoes. I am hoping Tricia can locate some in her travels to the farmers market, I gave
    up. Kathy, thanks so much for your good wishes on our anniversary, we had a lovely time with cocktails
    and dinner at a local Golf Club Reserve for family and friends. It was wonderful.

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  13. E-Bay! Now, I think I have heard anything. I love your resourcefulness.
    The Jerusalem artichoke soup recipe must be coming up sometime soon, so I hoped you saved a few :-)

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  14. You are committed, Kathy - I'm just waiting until they show up here. You roasted them so beautifully! I'm looking forward to trying them.

    Your morning visitor is beautiful, by the way.

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  15. Wow, I would never have even thought of finding veges on eBay! Thye look beautiful, all roasted and golden. Your morning visitor is so gorgeous.

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  16. Kathy, how fun that you got your sunchokes from ebay - I actually found a ton of them in the Netherlands where they are quite popular, especially for a Cream of Jerusalem Artichoke Soup - but you probably knew that already. They are also quite common in Germany as well - we love these tubers!
    Your presentation is wonderful, all roaasted and with such a great color!
    Have a great Sunday!

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  17. Wow, ugly as celery root--now that's a real food insult ;-) . But they sure look delicious cooked!

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  18. i've only had jerusalem artichokes a handful of times, but they sound great roasted like this!

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  19. Never cooked with jerusalem artichokes but for you, I am willing to try :D
    They look so golden and tender, roasted up!

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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  20. Hi Kathy, I have never eaten artichokes before but from your pic, can tell that this is very yummylicious. Thanks for sharing and warmest regards :)

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  21. Dear Kathy, I never had this but I would love to try it one day.
    p.s. I love your visitor. Blessings dear. Catherine

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  22. Artichoke hearts are so tender, and no comparison to any other ones. Very hard to peel, but so well worth it! Totally incredible, and super yummy! Love your morning visitor...so sweet!

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  23. Your dish is so beautifully presented! Looks fantastic.
    What a wonderful visitor!

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